FIFA LAWS OF THE GAME – CONDENSED 



LAW 01 FIELD OF PLAY: LYSL YOUTH FIELD SIZES U4-5 40 x 60 4x3 Goal U6-8 60 x 90 6x4 Goal U9-10 110 x 165 12x6 Goal U11-12 150 x 225 18x6’-6” Goal U13+ 210 x 315 24x8 Goal 


LAW 02 THE BALL: LYSL YOUTH BALL SIZES U4-8 #3U10-12 #4 U14 #5 


LAW 03 THE PLAYERS: LYSL TEAM SIZES U4-5 3 per team no keeper, substitutions typically at quarters or coach’s discretion U4-8 4 per team no keeper, substitutions typically at quarters or coach’s discretion U10 7 per team w/ keeper, anytime at field midpoint called in by referee U12 9 per team w/ keeper, anytime at field midpoint called in by referee U14 11 per team w/ keeper, anytime at field midpoint called in by referee.


LAW 04 THE PLAYERS’ EQUIPMENT: LYSL’S GUIDELINES U4-5 Shirt (provided by league), shorts, socks, shoes U6 –14 Jersey, shorts, sock, (all provided by the league), shinguards, socks, shoes (preferably cleats) Keeper Different color shirt or pinnie from teams on field.


LAW 05 AND 06 THE REFEREE’S: LYSL GUIDELINES U10 Center U12 Dual centers U14 Center and two AR’s


LAW 07 THE DURATION OF THE MATCH: LYSL GUIDELINES U4-5 4 five-minute quarters U6 -7 4 eight-minute quarters U8 4 ten-minute quarters U10 2 25-minute halves U12 2 30-minute halves U14 2 35-minute halves.


LAW 08 START AND RESTART OF PLAY Kick-off Procedure • the team that wins the toss of a coin decides which goal it will attack in the first half • their opponents take the kick-off • the team that wins the toss takes the kick-off to start the second half • for the second half, the teams change ends and attack the opposite goals • after a team scores a goal, the kick-off is taken by their opponents For every kick-off: • all players, except the player taking the kick-off, must be in their own half of the field of play • the opponents of the team taking the kick-off must be at least 9.15 m (10 yds) from the ball until it is in play • the ball must be stationary on the center mark • the referee gives a signal • the ball is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves • a goal may be scored directly against the opponents from the kick-off Offences and sanctions • If the player taking the kick-off touches the ball again before it has touched another player an indirect free kick, or for deliberate handball a direct free kick, is awarded. 


LAW 09 THE BALL IN AND OUT OF PLAY Ball out of play The ball is out of play when: • it has wholly passed over the goal line or touchline on the ground or in the air • play has been stopped by the referee Ball in play The ball is in play at all other times, including when it rebounds off a match official, goalpost, crossbar or corner flagpost and remains in the field of play.


LAW 10 DETERMINING THE OUTCOME OF THE MATCH: NOT CURRENTLY USED BY LSYL.


LAW 11 OFFSIDE Offside position It is not an offence to be in an offside position. A player is in an offside position if: 

• any part of the head, body or feet is in the opponents’ half (excluding the halfway line) and..


• any part of the head, body or feet is nearer to the opponents’ goal line than both the ball and the secondlast opponent The hands and arms of all players, including the goalkeepers, are not considered. A player is not in an offside position if level with the:


• second-last opponent or


• last two opponents Offside offence A player in an offside position at the moment the ball is played or touched* by a team-mate is only penalized on becoming involved in active play by:


• interfering with play by playing or touching a ball passed or touched by a team-mate or 


• interfering with an opponent by: 


• preventing an opponent from playing or being able to play the ball by clearly obstructing the opponent’s line of vision or 


• challenging an opponent for the ball or *The first point of contact of the ‘play’ or ‘touch’ of the ball should be used • clearly attempting to play a ball which is close when this action impacts on an opponent or 


• making an obvious action which clearly impacts on the ability of an opponent to play the ball or 


• gaining an advantage by playing the ball or interfering with an opponent when it has: • rebounded or been deflected off the goalpost, crossbar, match official or an opponent 


• been deliberately saved by any opponent A player in an offside position receiving the ball from an opponent who deliberately plays the ball (except from a deliberate save by any opponent) is not considered to have gained an advantage. A ‘save’ is when a player stops, or attempts to stop, a ball which is going into or very close to the goal with any part of the body except the hands/arms (unless the goalkeeper within the penalty area). In situations where: 


• a player moving from, or standing in, an offside position is in the way of an opponent and interferes with the movement of the opponent towards the ball this is an offside offence if it impacts on the ability of the opponent to play or challenge for the ball; if the player moves into the way of an opponent and impedes the opponent’s progress (e.g. blocks the opponent) the offence should be penalized under Law 12. 


• a player in an offside position is moving towards the ball with the intention of playing the ball and is fouled before playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the foul is penalized as it has occurred before the offside offence


• an offence is committed against a player in an offside position who is already playing or attempting to play the ball, or challenging an opponent for the ball, the offside offence is penalized as it has occurred before the foul challenge No offence There is no offside offence if a player receives the ball directly from: 


• a goal kick • a throw-in • a corner kick Offences and sanctions If an offside offence occurs, the referee awards an indirect free kick where the offence occurred, including if it is in the player’s own half of the field of play. A defending player who leaves the field of play without the referee’s permission shall be considered to be on the goal line or touchline for the purposes of offside until the next stoppage in play or until the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area. If the player left the field of play deliberately, the player must be cautioned when the ball is next out of play. 


An attacking player may step or stay off the field of play not to be involved in active play. If the player re-enters from the goal line and becomes involved in play before the next stoppage in play, or the defending team has played the ball towards the halfway line and it is outside their penalty area, the player shall be considered to be positioned on the goal line for the purposes of offside.


A player who deliberately leaves the field of play and reenters without the referee’s permission and is not penalized for offside and gains an advantage, must be cautioned. If an attacking player remains stationary between the goalposts and inside the goal as the ball enters the goal, a goal must be awarded unless the player commits an offside offence or Law 12 offence in which case play is restarted with an indirect or direct free kick. 


LAW 12 FOULS AND MISCONDUCT Direct and indirect free kicks and penalty kicks can only be awarded for offences committed when the ball is in play. Direct free kick A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences against an opponent in a manner considered by the referee to be careless, reckless or using excessive force: 


• charges • jumps at • kicks or attempts to kick • pushes • strikes or attempts to strike (including head-butt) • tackles or challenges • trips or attempts to trip If an offence involves contact it is penalized by a direct free kick or penalty kick.


• Careless is when a player shows a lack of attention or consideration when making a challenge or acts without precaution. No disciplinary sanction is needed • Reckless is when a player acts with disregard to the danger to, or consequences for, an opponent and must be cautioned


• Using excessive force is when a player exceeds the necessary use of force and/or endangers the safety of an opponent and must be sent off A direct free kick is awarded if a player commits any of the following offences: 


• handles the ball deliberately (except for the goalkeeper within their penalty area) 


• holds an opponent • impedes an opponent with contact 


• bites or spits at someone • throws an object at the ball, opponent or match official, or makes contact with the ball with a held object Handling the ball Handling the ball involves a deliberate act of a player making contact with the ball with the hand or arm. 


The following must be considered: 


• the movement of the hand towards the ball (not the ball towards the hand) 


• the distance between the opponent and the ball (unexpected ball)


• the position of the hand does not necessarily mean that there is an offence The goalkeeper has the same restrictions on handling the ball as any other player outside the penalty area. Inside their penalty area, the goalkeeper cannot be guilty of a handling offence incurring a direct free kick or any related sanction but can be guilty of handling offences that incur an indirect free kick. Indirect free kick An indirect free kick is awarded if a player:


• plays in a dangerous manner 


• impedes the progress of an opponent without any contact being made


• is guilty of dissent, using offensive, insulting or abusive language and/or gestures or other verbal offences 


• prevents the goalkeeper from releasing the ball from the hands or kicks or attempts to kick the ball when the goalkeeper is in the process of releasing it


• commits any other offence, not mentioned in the Laws, for which play is stopped to caution or send off a player An indirect free kick is awarded if a goalkeeper, inside their penalty area, commits any of the following offences: • controls the ball with the hands for more than six seconds before releasing it 


• touches the ball with the hands after: 


• releasing it and before it has touched another player


• it has been deliberately kicked to the goalkeeper by a team-mate 


• receiving it directly from a throw-in taken by a team-mate A goalkeeper is considered to be in control of the ball when:


• the ball is between the hands or between the hand and any surface (e.g. ground, own body) or by touching it with any part of the hands or arms except if the ball rebounds from the goalkeeper or the goalkeeper has made a save 


• holding the ball in the outstretched open hand 


• bouncing it on the ground or throwing it in the air A goalkeeper cannot be challenged by an opponent when in control of the ball with the hands. Playing in a dangerous manner Playing in a dangerous manner is any action that, while trying to play the ball, threatens injury to someone (including the player themself), and includes preventing a nearby opponent from playing the ball for fear of injury. A scissors or bicycle kick is permissible provided that it is not dangerous to an opponent. Impeding the progress of an opponent without contact Impeding the progress of an opponent means moving into the opponent’s path to obstruct, block, slow down or force a change of direction when the ball is not within playing distance of either player. All players have a right to their position on the field of play; being in the way of an opponent is not the same as moving into the way of an opponent. A player may shield the ball by taking a position between an opponent and the ball if the ball is within playing distance and the opponent is not held off with the arms or body. If the ball is within playing distance, the player may be fairly charged by an opponent. 


LAW 13 FREE KICKS Types of free kick Direct and indirect free kicks are awarded to the opposing team of a player guilty of an offence. Indirect free kick signal The referee indicates an indirect free kick by raising the arm above the head; this signal is maintained until the kick has been taken and the ball touches another player or goes out of play. An indirect free kick must be retaken if the referee fails to signal that the kick is indirect and the ball is kicked directly into the goal. Ball enters the goal • if a direct free kick is kicked directly into the opponents’ goal, a goal is awarded Procedure All free kicks are taken from the place where the offence occurred, except: • indirect free kicks to the attacking team for an offence inside the opponents’ goal area are taken from the nearest point on the goal area line which runs parallel to the goal line 


• free kicks to the defending team in their goal area may be taken from anywhere in that area The ball: 


• must be stationary and the kicker must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player 


• is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves except for a free kick to the defending team in their penalty area where the ball is in play when it is kicked directly out of the penalty area Until the ball is in play all opponents must remain: 


• at least 10 yds from the ball, unless they are on their own goal line between the goalposts 


• outside the penalty area for free kicks inside the opponents’ penalty area A free kick can be taken by lifting the ball with a foot or both feet simultaneously. Feinting to take a free kick to confuse opponents is permitted as part of football. If a player, while correctly taking a free kick, intentionally kicks the ball at an opponent in order to play the ball again but not in a careless or reckless manner or using excessive force, the referee allows play to continue. Offences and sanctions If, when a free kick is taken, an opponent is closer to the ball than the required distance, the kick is retaken unless the advantage can be applied; but if a player takes a free kick quickly and an opponent who is less than 10 yds. from the ball intercepts it, the referee allows play to continue. However, an opponent who deliberately prevents a free kick being taken quickly must be cautioned for delaying the restart of play. If, when a free kick is taken by the defending team from inside its penalty area, any opponents are inside the penalty area because they did not have time to leave, the referee allows play to continue.


If an opponent who is in the penalty area when the free kick is taken, or enters the penalty area before the ball is in play, touches or challenges for the ball before it has touched another player, the free kick is retaken. If, when a free kick is taken by the defending team inside its penalty area, the ball is not kicked directly out of the penalty area the kick is retaken. If, after the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball again before it has touched another player an indirect free kick is awarded, if the kicker deliberately handles the ball: • a direct free kick is awarded • a penalty kick is awarded if the offence occurred inside the kicker’s penalty area unless the kicker was the goalkeeper in which case an indirect free kick is awarded.


LAW 14 THE PENALTY KICK A penalty kick is awarded if a player commits a direct free kick offence inside their penalty area or off the field as part of play as outlined in Laws 12 and 13. A goal may be scored directly from a penalty kick. Procedure The ball must be stationary on the penalty mark. The player taking the penalty kick must be clearly identified. The defending goalkeeper must remain on the goal line, facing the kicker, between the goalposts until the ball has been kicked. The players other than the kicker and goalkeeper must be: • at least 10 yds. from the penalty mark 


• behind the penalty mark 


• inside the field of play 


• outside the penalty area After the players have taken positions in accordance with this Law, the referee signals for the penalty kick to be taken. The player taking the penalty kick must kick the ball forward; backheeling is permitted provided the ball moves forward. The ball is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves. The kicker must not play the ball again until it has touched another player. The penalty kick is completed when the ball stops moving, goes out of play or the referee stops play for any offence. Additional time is allowed for a penalty kick to be taken and completed at the end of each half of the match or extra time. When additional time is allowed, the penalty kick is completed when, after the kick has been taken, the ball stops moving, goes out of play, is played by any player (including the kicker) other than the defending goalkeeper, or the referee stops play for an offence by the kicker or the kicker’s team. If a defending team player (including the goalkeeper) commits an offence and the penalty is missed/saved, the penalty is retaken.


LAW 15 THE THROW IN: A throw-in is awarded to the opponents of the player who last touched the ball when the whole of the ball passes over the touchline, on the ground or in the air. A goal cannot be scored directly from a throw-in: 


• if the ball enters the opponents’ goal – a goal kick is awarded


• if the ball enters the thrower’s goal – a corner kick is awarded Procedure At the moment of delivering the ball, the thrower must: • stand facing the field of play 


• have part of each foot on the touchline or on the ground outside the touchline • throw the ball with both hands from behind and over the head from the point where it left the field of play 


• must take throw with 1 yd of where ball left field All opponents must stand at least 2 yds from the point at which the throw-in is taken. The ball is in play when it enters the field of play. If the ball touches the ground before entering, the throw-in is retaken by the same team from the same position. If the throw-in is not taken correctly it is retaken by the opposing team. If a player, while correctly taking a throw-in, intentionally throws the ball at an opponent in order to play the ball again but neither in a careless nor a reckless manner nor using excessive force, the referee allows play to continue. The thrower must not touch the ball again until it has touched another player. Offences and sanctions If, after the ball is in play, the thrower touches the ball again before it has touched another player an indirect free kick is awarded; if the thrower deliberately handles the ball: 


• a direct free kick is awarded 


• a penalty kick is awarded if the offence occurred inside the thrower’s penalty area unless the ball was handled by the defending team’s goalkeeper in which case an indirect free kick is awarded An opponent who unfairly distracts or impedes the thrower (including moving closer than 2 yds to the place where the throw-in is to be taken) is cautioned for unsporting behavior and if the throw-in has been taken an indirect free kick is awarded. 


LAW 16 THE GOAL KIC: A goal kick is awarded when the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, on the ground or in the air, having last touched a player of the attacking team, and a goal is not scored. A goal may be scored directly from a goal kick, but only against the opposing team; if the ball directly enters the kicker’s goal a corner kick is awarded to the opponents if the ball left the penalty area. Procedure • The ball must be stationary and is kicked from any point within the goal area by a player of the defending team • The ball is in play when it leaves the penalty area 


• Opponents must be outside the penalty area until the ball is in play Offences and sanctions If the ball does not leave the penalty area or is touched by a player before it leaves the penalty area the kick is retaken. If, after the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball again before it has touched another player an indirect free kick is awarded; if the kicker deliberately handles the ball: 


• a direct free kick is awarded • a penalty kick is awarded if the offence occurred inside the kicker’s penalty area unless the kicker was the goalkeeper in which case an indirect free kick is awarded If an opponent who is in the penalty area when the goal kick is taken, or enters the penalty area before the ball is in play, touches or challenges for the ball before it has touched another player, the goal kick is retaken. If a player enters the penalty area before the ball is in play and fouls or is fouled by an opponent, the goal kick is retaken and the offender may be cautioned or sent off depending on the offence 


LAW 17 THE CORNER KICK: A corner kick is awarded when the whole of the ball passes over the goal line, on the ground or in the air, having last touched a player of the defending team, and a goal is not scored. A goal may be scored directly from a corner kick, but only against the opposing team; if the ball directly enters the kicker’s goal a corner kick is awarded to the opponents. Procedure 


• The ball must be placed in the corner area nearest to the point where the ball passed over the goal line 


• The ball must be stationary and is kicked by a player of the attacking team 


• The ball is in play when it is kicked and clearly moves; it does not need to leave the corner area 


• The corner flagpost must not be moved • Opponents must remain at least 10 yds from the corner arc until the ball is in play Offences and sanctions If, after the ball is in play, the kicker touches the ball again before it has touched another player an indirect free kick is awarded; if the kicker deliberately handles the ball: 


• a direct free kick is awarded 


• a penalty kick is awarded if the offence occurred inside the kicker’s penalty area unless the kicker was the goalkeeper in which case an indirect free kick is awarded If a player, while correctly taking a corner kick, intentionally kicks the ball at an opponent in order to play the ball again but not in a careless or reckless manner or using excessive force, the referee allows play to continue.